miércoles, 25 de junio de 2008

AZ en MARCASUR - AZ in MARCASUR

Digital Audio Broadcasting Regulations

A new law focusing on digital television in Chile may signal a growing pressure to regulate the transmission of digital audio broadcasting in the near future. Audio broadcasting is the medium with the greatest reach in Chile. The nation is known for its prominent oral culture and has served as the continent’s pioneer in advancements in this field.

Digital Audio Broadcasting has three international norms, which has led Europe and the United States to adopt different technical norms. While the former conducted research with a focus on the Eureka 147 Project, North Americans conduct research via the iBiquity digital corporation, which developed the system known as In-band On-Channel (IBOC). The DRM developed a system for transmission below 30 MHz.

Much like television, digital radio requires a special receiver, which calls for an investment in the means of reception and a period of co-existence, wherein analog and digital signals are transmitted simultaneously (simulcast).

The radio-electric spectrum in Chile is highly saturated, which makes it almost impossible to designate a new band for the system. The idea is to make the most of the existing system and transform it into a digital system.

On hectometric bands, broadcasting occurs between 535 KHz and 1605 KHz. Each broadcasting station possesses a 10 KHz bandwidth and each station is separated by 10 KHz. This is known as the broadcasting of the amplitude modulation signal.

On metric bands, the frequency modulation transmissions occur between 88 MHz and 108 MHz. Here, each broadcasting station possesses a 180 KHz bandwidth and is separated by 200 KHz.

The quality of reception in the digital system is equivalent to that of a CD. This means that AM transmission stations benefit the most.

Chile has opted for the IBOC system.

As for the regulatory perspective, the Department of Transportation and Telecommunications’ Supreme Decree No. 127, of 2006, assigned the 1452 – 1492 MHz band to digital radio.

For the existing FM broadcasting stations in Chile, these changes present both threats and opportunities.

Threats
- Appearance of regional radio stations in the Metropolitan area.
- Period of Simulcasting with high electrical energy costs financed by the operator.
- Resurgence of the entire AM dial. Great loss in non-urban sectors. - AM, with fewer transmitters, covers the same territory.
Opportunities
- Appearance of regional radio stations in the Metropolitan area.
- Period of Simulcasting with high electrical energy costs financed by the operator.
- Resurgence of the entire AM dial. Great loss in non-urban sectors.
- AM, with fewer transmitters, covers the same territory.
- A single national frequency.
- Multiplexer broadcasting stations in areas with a single transmitter. Greater coverage at lower prices.
- Large vehicle reach.
- Central Music Server with a common use.

Along this line, in Chile, the audio broadcasters in frequency modulation have proven to have a more successful business model than the audio broadcasters in amplitude modulation, as they have been able to promote these services at unforeseen levels and have virtually captured all radio listeners. This brings with it, as is evident today, the existence of a large number of radio broadcasting stations in amplitude modulation that practically do not transmit or use their broadcasting stations for alternative purposes, which must be taken into consideration in the future.

Juan Cristóbal Guzmán
Albagli Zaliasnik
Attorneys at Law
Si desean leer este artículo en español, visiten el siguiente link: Chile: Normativa sobre Radiodifusión Sonora.

No hay comentarios: